Wednesday, 4 September 2013

Start a Egg Substitutes Making Business

Start a Egg Substitutes Making  Business




         


What is Egg Substitute ?

Egg Substitute is listed in many low fat or low cholesterol recipes as an alternative to whole eggs. Egg substitute looks a lot like beaten eggs, but what’s it made of?
 Most egg substitute products—fresh, frozen or powdered—contain mostly egg whites, so if you have an egg allergy, these are not suitable as egg alternatives. But egg substitute is an excellent alternative to eggs if you want to cut your intake of fat and cholesterol, which are concentrated in the egg’s yolk.
Although whole eggs are not especially high in fat—just 5 grams of total fat and less than 2 grams of saturated fat per egg—they are notoriously high in dietary cholesterol, containing more than two-thirds the daily recommended total. So multi-egg dishes such as omelets and frittatas, which often contain cheese or other high-fat, high-cholesterol ingredients, are good candidates for using egg substitute.

 What else in is egg substitute?

Well, egg substitute products such as Egg Beaters brand, contain 99 percent egg whites. The other one percent comprises undefined “natural flavor,” coloring, spices, salt, onion powder, xanthan gum and guar gum. Many nutrients are added to make up for the ones lost from the yolk, so egg substitute will usually contain varying amounts of iron, zinc, folate, thiamin, riboflavin, vitamins A, E, B6 and B12, and have an equivalent amount of protein as whole eggs. While some brands, like Egg Beaters, contain no fat or cholesterol, others use vegetable oil as an ingredient, which adds to the fat content again—though the fat is largely unsaturated.
  Check the label on the egg-substitute product to see if it’s low enough in fat, and also to see    whether the egg substitute is suitable for all your needs. Some egg-substitute products are great for adding leavening qualities to baked goods, but unless the egg-substitute also contains added lecithin, which is normally found in egg yolks, it can't act as an emulsifier, or thickener. This also makes egg substitute unsuitable for custards. In these cases, it's wiser to replace some rather than all whole eggs if you need to lower the fat and cholesterol content of a recipe. Powdered egg substitute may work very nicely in baking but not at all in scrambled eggs. If you need an egg-free alternative for this, then tofu would be your best bet.
There are plenty of egg substitutes available for baking or preparing a dish that calls for eggs. Ener-G Egg Replacer is a reliable egg substitute for use in baking. It is available at health food stores and most grocery stores.

Tofu: Tofu is great for egg substitutions in recipes that call for a lot of eggs, like quiches or custards. To replace one egg in a recipe, purée 1/4 cup soft tofu. It is important to keep in mind that although tofu doesn't fluff up like eggs, it does create a texture that is perfect for "eggy" dishes.

Tofu  is also a great substitute for eggs in eggless egg salad and breakfast scrambles.

In Desserts and Sweet, Baked Goods:
 Try substituting one banana or 1/4 cup applesauce for each egg called for in a recipe for sweet, baked desserts. These will add some flavor to the recipe, so make sure bananas or apples are compatible with the other flavors in the dessert.




Other Egg Replacement Options
• 1 egg = 2 Tbsp. potato starch
• 1 egg = 1/4 cup mashed potatoes
• 1 egg = 1/4 cup canned pumpkin or squash
• 1 egg = 1/4 cup puréed prunes
• 1 egg = 2 Tbsp. water + 1 Tbsp. oil + 2 tsp. baking powder
• 1 egg = 1 Tbsp. ground flax seed simmered in 3 Tbsp. water
• 1 egg white = 1 Tbsp. plain agar powder dissolved in 1 Tbsp. water, whipped, chilled, and whipped again

Egg Replacement Tips




• If a recipe calls for three or more eggs, it is important to choose a replacer that will perform the same function (i.e., binding or leavening).
• Trying to replicate airy baked goods that call for a lot of eggs, such as angel food cake, can be very difficult. Instead, look for a recipe with a similar taste but fewer eggs, which will be easier to replicate.
• When adding tofu to a recipe as an egg replacer, be sure to purée it first to avoid chunks in the finished product.
• Be sure to use plain tofu, not seasoned or baked, as a replacer.
• Powdered egg replacers cannot be used to create egg recipes such as scrambles or omelets. Tofu is the perfect substitute for eggs in these applications.
• If you want a lighter texture and you're using fruit purées as an egg substitute, add an extra 1/2 tsp. baking powder. Fruit purées tend to make the final product denser than the original recipe.
• If you're looking for an egg replacer that binds, try adding 2 to 3 Tbsp. of any of the following for each egg: tomato paste, potato starch, arrowroot powder, whole wheat flour, mashed potatoes, mashed sweet potatoes, instant potato flakes, or 1/4 cup tofu puréed with 1 Tbsp. flour.

Fruit makes an excellent replacement for eggs - try bananas, apple puree or any high protein content fruit. Usually 1/4 cup of banana will replace 1 egg.

Grind 1 tbsp whole flax seeds (or use 2 1/2 tbsp pre-ground flaxseed) and combine with 3 tablespoons of water to replace one egg





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